Building Reports and Analyzing Data (4.x)

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Sample reports
Building reports
Exporting reports to Excel
Viewing the dashboard
Viewing data in Tableau (coming soon)
Using the search function


Sample Reports


Simple Tally Report With Bar Chart
Tally Report With Multiple Questions
Simple Tally Report With Stacked Bar Chart
Multiple Stacked Bar Charts
Tally Report With Results In Table
Standard Report By Type
Standard Report By Number
List Report


Building Reports

Submitted data can be visualized in the reports section of ELMO. Click the Reports tab on the main menu bar to access this section. Coordinators can generate reports from responses submitted by all users, while observers are only able to generate reports from their own responses.

To create a report:

  1. Click the Create New Report link at the top of the page
  2. Three types of report options will be offered:
  1. Tally Report: Shows aggregated tallies of answers or responses, grouped by attributes of interest. For example, you want to see the percentages of Yes versus No on all the Yes/No questions in the form. If selected, choose the following prompts:
    • For tallies to show Answers per Question or Responses per Answer/Attribute
    • Data to be presented in a Table or Bar Chart format
    • Percentage Style (if Table is selected) or Bar Style (if Bar Chart is selected)
    • How the titles should be displayed Full Titles (Full text of questions) or Codes Only (Displays the unique code given when creating questions, see the Questions section on the Creating a general form page.)
    • A title for the report
    • Then, after clicking Next, select all the forms from which you want to include data
    • Select the column header information

  2. List Report: A raw listing of answers and attributes for a set of responses. For example, you want to see all the comments made on two forms. If selected, choose the following prompts:
    • How the titles should be displayed – Full Titles (Full text of questions) or Codes Only (Displays unique code given when creating questions, see the Questions section on the Creating a general form page.)
    • A title for the report
    • Then, after clicking Next, select all the forms from which you want to include data
    • Select the column header information

  3. Standard Report: A question-by-question summary of the responses for a specific form. If selected, choose the following prompts:
    • Form to report on
    • How should the questions be ordered?: Selecting By Number will present the questions as much as possible in the order they appear in the report, selecting By Type will group the questions according to data type (e.g. Yes/No questions listed in the first group, integer-based questions next, etc.)
    • Split Report by a Special Question: This option allows report data to appear according to the options of a certain question. For example, if a gender question is selected for this option, then responses for the form will be separated by responses by those who selected female and those who selected male
    • How the titles should be displayed: Full Titles (Full text of questions) or Codes Only (Displays the unique code given when creating questions, see the Questions section on the Creating a general form page.)
    • Whether or not to omit long text answers
    • A title for the report

Exporting Reports to Excel

If the options available within the reports section do not meet mission needs for analyzing collected data, the data can be exported to a .csv file (by selecting the Export to CSV Format option), a format readable in Excel. This is useful when election observation teams want to perform deeper analysis or channel data collected through ELMO into external programs.

To export data from ELMO reports:

  1. Select any tally report or list report from the Reports page
  2. Select Export Data to CSV Format

The CSV file will download.

**Note that reports which display in bar chart form or percentages will by default export data in regular tally form.


Viewing the dashboard

The screen that appears after a user logs into ELMO is the Dashboard. This feature gives a high-level overview of gathered data, and can be customized. The Dashboard refreshes every thirty seconds in order to provide the most up to date information possible. Incoming forms will automatically populate the responses section of the dashboard as well as any relevant report. Visible on the dashboard screen are:

  • Recent form responses
  • An overview of geographic data submitted with responses
  • An overview of all form submissions
  • All reports created in the mission

**Note: Upon login, the report with the most views, or created first in the case of equal views, will appear on the dashboard screen. Other generated reports can easily be selected from the drop down many for display on the dashboard.

Dashboard


Viewing the data in Tableau

Coming soon.


Using the Search Function

ELMO Online allows for both simple and more sophisticated specific text searches that use qualifiers to locate information within certain fields across a mission. It is important to note that the search function will only search for specific text within text responses. ELMO currently does not have the capacity to search binary and multiple choice question text.

ELMO’s search is very flexible and powerful. There is a Search Help link below the search textbox that shows more possibilities, but some of them will be discussed in more detail below using two larger examples: Searching across responses, and trying to limit searches based on specific observers.


Searching Responses

Simple Search: Responses

Conducting a simple search on the Responses page (without additional qualifiers, which are discussed below) will provide all responses that contain the search term in one or more textual answers. The results will be sorted by response ID and then by question, where answers to questions will be listed if they contain the entered search terms. For example, a simple search for Thomas Daniel will find any answers to text questions that contain the word Thomas AND the word Daniel in them.

On the Responses page, responses given to forms (e.g. election observation checklists) by respondents (e.g. election observers) are searchable. When a search is executed, the search results are organized by the response ID, which is the unique number given to a response by a given user and at a given time. In the example below, Internet was the term used in the search:

Search Results

By clicking on a response ID in the list of search results, the full set of answers to the form of interest will be displayed, with the search term highlighted in yellow. In the example below, the word Internet was the term used in the search:

Search Internet

Qualifiers: Responses

Using qualifiers in the search box can help to narrow the number of search results. For example, using the search terms form: Elections will only show responses to the form titled Elections. Combining the terms so: Thomas Daniel form: “Elections” will find responses to the form Elections that contain the words Thomas and Daniel. When searching for a specific phrase (e.g. completion of the tally process), use the appropriate search qualifier and double quotes for the string of words (e.g. Text:“completion of the tally process” or Form:“Kenya Test Checklist”).

Qualifiers that can be used are:

  • Form: The name of the form to be searched in quotation marks (e.g. Form:“Kenya Test Checklist”)
  • Submitter: The name of the user that submitted the response (partial matches allowed)
  • Submit-date: The date the response was submitted (e.g. 1985-03-22)
  • Reviewed: Whether the response has been marked as reviewed (1 = yes or 0 = no)
  • Source: The medium via which the response was submitted (web, ODK, or SMS)
  • Text: Searches answers to textual questions (Note: this is also the default qualifier, i.e. if you do not use a qualifier at all, the feature will search answers to textual questions for the words you enter into the search box)

Combining Qualifiers: Responses

Combining qualifiers helps to further narrow the results of a search. An example of using all qualifiers possible to search responses within an ELMO mission is:

Source: ODK reviewed:1 form: closing submitter: LTO4 submit-date: 2013-3-5 finger ink technical

The above string of qualifiers tells ELMO to search for responses that match the following criteria:

  • Source: Submitted via ODK Collect (tablet/smart phone)
  • Reviewed: Marked as reviewed
  • Form: Submitted via the form titled “Closing”
  • Submitter: Submitted by the user LTO4
  • Submit Date: Submitted on March 5, 2013
  • Finger Ink Technical: Contain the words finger AND ink AND technical

Exact Phrases: Responses

Searching for exact phrases is done by enclosing all words in quotations. For example, entering the search terms “election monitoring will only find responses that contain the exact and complete phrase election monitoring. Phrases in quotations can be mixed with phrases not in quotations to narrow the search conducted. For example, conducting a search for the terms votes ballotselection monitoring” will provide all responses with the exact and complete phrase election monitoring as well as the words votes and ballots.

All Terms vs. Any Term: Responses

By default, all terms in the search must be matched. For example, votes ballots election monitoring matches only responses with all three of those words. Use the vertical bar (‘|’) to search for responses that may not contain one or multiple of the words being used in the search. For example, searching votes | ballots | election monitoring, will find answers to textual questions that contain the words votes OR ballots OR election monitoring. The ‘|’ character can also be used with qualifiers:form: (votes | “election monitoring” | ballots) matches responses for any of the above forms. Note that parentheses must be used so that the qualifier “form:” is applied to each of the terms.

Operators: Responses

A qualified search can be negated by using the negation operator, which is an exclamation point (!). For example, using the search terms form != Elections will match responses for any form except the form titled “Elections.” For text searches, negation works differently. Instead of using an exclamation point, text searches can negate terms by using the minus/dash symbol (). The search terms ballot –box, will match any response with an answer containing the word ballot but not the word box. There must be at least one non-negated term in any such search.

For some qualifiers (e.g. submit-date:), greater-than and less-than comparisons are also allowed, for example:

Submit-date > 2000-01-0

Several greater-than or less-than qualifiers can be combined to narrow the search to a range, for example the following string of qualifiers will match responses submitted in the month of January 2000:

Submit-date >= 2000-01-01 submit-date < 2000-02-01

Combining Qualifiers and Operators: Responses

Combining the strings explained above allows users to carry out deep searches of responses. Building off of the example that combines the full set of qualifiers, here is an example of search terms that combine qualifiers and operators along with other features (any terms, all terms, negation):

Source: ODK reviewed:1 form!: (“Opening Checklist” | “Polling Checklist”) submitter: (LTO3 | LTO4) submit-date<=2013-3-5 finger| ink technical –boxes

The above string of qualifiers tells ELMO to search for responses which match the following criteria:

  • Source: Submitted via ODK Collect (tablet/smart phone)
  • Reviewed: Marked as reviewed
  • Form!: Submitted via a form not titled Opening Checklist OR Polling Checklist
  • Submitter: Submitted by the user LTO3 OR LTO4
  • Submit-Date: Submitted on OR later than March 5, 2013
  • Finger| ink technical: Contain the words finger OR ink AND technical
  • Finger| ink technical –boxes: Do NOT contain the word boxes

Searching Questions

ELMO also allows the user to perform a number of searches on the pool of questions that have been created. To search questions, first click the Questions tab on the top menu. The result will be a search textbook followed by a list of all of the questions that have been added to the mission. Here users can utilize the simple search, or one of the following qualifiers:

  • Title: The question title (partial matches allowed)
  • Code: The question code (partial matches allowed)
  • Type: The question type (text, long-text, select-one, select-multiple, date, etc.)
  • Tag: Searches tags users have applied to the question

Searching User Information

Simple Search: User

On the Users page, the search function finds information that is organized by the user profile in which the searched terms appear. In the example below the last name Hamilton was the term used in the search:

User Search

Conducting a simple search for a specific term(s) or individual(s) on the Users page will organize all results by the user profile that they are associated with. A simple search, such as for: Thomas and Daniel, will only provide a match for these terms in the name section of a user profile. To search for other user profile attributes (e.g. email, phone number, etc.) a qualifier must be used.

Qualifiers

To search based on user attributes other than name, use a qualifier. The full set of qualifiers for the user page is below:

  • Name: The user’s full name
  • Login: The user’s login name
  • Email: The user’s email address
  • Phone: The user’s phone number (no dashes or other punctuation)

For example, a search for: Susan email:@example.com, will narrow the results by searching for users named Susan with an example.com email address.

**Note that partial matches are allowed for all qualifiers.

Exact Phrases: User

Exact phrases can be matched by enclosing the phrase in quotations: “John Smith”.

All Terms vs. Any Term: User

By default, all terms in the search must be matched. For example, searching for: John Smith matches only users with John and Smith both appearing in their name.

You can use the vertical bar  (‘|’) to search for responses that may not contain one or multiple of the names being searched. For example, if searching for the names Thomas, Daniel and Eli, but without certainty that any of the three individuals has a profile in ELMO, then use the vertical bar between all three names during the search: (Thomas | Daniel | Eli). The ‘|’ character can also be used with qualifiersemail:(john@example.com | patty@foo.com) matches users with any of the above email addresses.

**Note that parentheses must be used in the previous example so that the qualifier “email:” is applied to each of the terms.

Negation

A qualified search can be negated by using the negation operator. Name != Carter will match users not named Carter.